Chapel Hill sisters write words of inspiration

The Associated Press

0 Comments | Leave a Comment

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) — Pansy F. Dodson's words meant to uplift are written, printed, sealed in envelopes and sent out to about 200 people each and every month for the past 14 years. They are received by nursing homes, people grieving, lifelong friends and a variety of people she and her sister have met over the years. Dodson turns 91 in July.

"These are amateurish, just from the heart," she said about her verses offering comfort. "People deserve a little lift."

It began in 1999 with sister Madeline F. Sparrow, who sent about 70 cards each month to shut-ins, friends and church members through the Quiet Care Committee at her church, University United Methodist in Chapel Hill. The list includes friends for decades and people she hardly knows. It was hard not to duplicate cards, Sparrow said, so she turned to her sister.

Dodson began writing the verses, limericks really, that rhymed, about the seasons, holidays, God, her garden and even the squirrels in her yard. She sits inside by her kitchen window or on the large covered porch at her home in Chapel Hill and takes her inspiration from nature. Dodson has a list of people to send the verses to as well as Sparrow's list. A third sister, Violet, included Dodson's verses in her 35 monthly card mailings, too, until her death last fall. Now, Sparrow and Dodson send between 185 and 200 cards every month, a new verse printed on patterned paper for the season.

That's a lot of stamps.

"I don't drink and I don't smoke, and that's my fun money," Dodson said. "I pay for mine, and she for hers," she said, sitting on her porch with Sparrow one afternoon last week. She emails some, too. Some of the recipients are those who were in the Fuller Memorial Presbyterian Church youth group, which Dodson began working with in her 20s. She also worked with youth at New Hope Presbyterian Church, where she is a member now.

Dodson compiled her verses for several months and seasons from 2000 to 2012 into "Blessings and Hugs from the Sisters," a book published by WestBow Press, the Christian self-publishing division of Thomas Nelson.

"It's just a project for me, not to make a dime off of," Dodson said. "Now I'm dumb enough to try another one - a letter to my granddaughter about the road traveled. She says, 'Grandma, tell me this, tell me that. Write it down.'" So that's what Dodson is doing.

She grew up in Durham, one of five - four sisters and a brother. Dodson graduated from Durham High School in 1941. She worked at Liggett & Myers cigarette factory in Durham for 38 years, starting off as an hourly employee and retiring as management.

"Women didn't make what men did in those days. It was a trying time, but a good place to work," Dodson said. "That's the way it was. But now women and girls know better."

Dodson and Sparrow live a few miles from each other in Chapel Hill. Dodson's first husband died and she moved to Chapel Hill 45 years ago with her second. Sparrow married and came to Chapel Hill 66 years ago. Sparrow, who spent her career in retail, is 84 years old now.

When Dodson's second husband died in January 2012, she felt lost.

"He was my life. I was so depressed and down," she said. People who received her writings had suggested she put them together in a book. "This was a focus for me." Dodson said Sparrow encouraged her, and that "Blessings and Hugs from the Sisters" has turned out to be a lovely book. Dodson keeps a binder full of her verses, with June 2013 already included, written about a visit to Wrightsville Beach.

In each letter is a coupon for a hug. It's about the size of a business card, with a photo of a flower on it and "Hug Coupon. Redeem When Needed." She also includes those when she pays her bills.

"Isn't that silly? I know how it is to work in an office all day. It might bring a smile to their day," Dodson said.

Each copy of "Blessings and Hugs from the Sisters" includes a hug coupon, too. Included in the book is her 2005 submission of "July Thoughts," in which she writes about the heat and humidity's impact on the garden, revived when evening arrives. The final lines are "Our lives also have this kind of change: We go through drought, storms, and rain. God, however, sees us through, Bringing comfort to me and you."

___

Information from: The Herald-Sun, http://www.herald-sun.com

ERROR 500 - INTERNAL SERVER ERROR

Why am I seeing this page?

500 errors usually mean that the server has encountered an unexpected condition that prevented it from fulfilling the request made by the client. This is a general error class returned by a web server when it encounters a problem in which the server itself can not be more specific about the error condition in its response to the client.

In many cases this is not an indication of an actual problem with the server itself but rather a problem with the information the server has been instructed to access or return as a result of the request. This error is often caused by an issue on your site which may require additional review by our support teams.

Our support staff will be happy to assist you in resolving this issue. Please contact our Live Support or reply to any Tickets you may have received from our technicians for further assistance.

Is there anything that I can do?

There are a few common causes for this error code including problems with the individual script that may be executed upon request. Some of these are easier to spot and correct than others.

File and Directory Ownership

The server you are on runs applications in a very specific way in most cases. The server generally expects files and directories be owned by your specific user cPanel user. If you have made changes to the file ownership on your own through SSH please reset the Owner and Group appropriately.

File and Directory Permissions

The server you are on runs applications in a very specific way in most cases. The server generally expects files such as HTML, Images, and other media to have a permission mode of 644. The server also expects the permission mode on directories to be set to 755 in most cases.

(See the Section on Understanding Filesystem Permissions.)

Command Syntax Errors in .htaccess file

In the .htaccess file, you may have added lines that are conflicting with each other or that are not allowed.

If you would like to check a specific rule in your .htaccess file you can comment that specific line in the .htaccess by adding # to the beginning of the line. You should always make a backup of this file before you start making changes.

For example, if the .htaccess looks like

DirectoryIndex default.html
AddType application/x-httpd-php5 php

Then try something like this

DirectoryIndex default.html
#AddType application/x-httpd-php5 php

Note: Due to the way in which our server environments are setup you may not use php_value arguments in a .htaccess file.

Exceeded Process Limits

It is possible that this error is caused by having too many processes in the server queue for your individual account. Every account on our server may only have 25 simultaneous processes active at any point in time whether they are related to your site or other processes owned by your user such as mail.

With SSH (shell) access, you can view the processes running on your account. Simply type this command:

ps faux

Or type this to view a specific user's account (be sure to replace username with the actual username):

ps faux |grep username

Once you have the process ID ("pid"), type this to kill the specific process (be sure to replace pid with the actual process ID):

kill pid

Our server administrators will be able to advise you on how to avoid this error if it is caused by process limitations. Please contact our Live Support or open a Ticket. Be sure to include the steps needed for our support staff to see the 500 error on your site.

Understanding Filesystem Permissions

Symbolic Representation

The first character indicates the file type and is not related to permissions. The remaining nine characters are in three sets, each representing a class of permissions as three characters. The first set represents the user class. The second set represents the group class. The third set represents the others class.

Each of the three characters represent the read, write, and execute permissions:

  • r if reading is permitted, - if it is not.
  • w if writing is permitted, - if it is not.
  • x if execution is permitted, - if it is not.

The following are some examples of symbolic notation:

  • -rwxr-xr-x a regular file whose user class has full permissions and whose group and others classes have only the read and execute permissions.
  • crw-rw-r-- a character special file whose user and group classes have the read and write permissions and whose others class has only the read permission.
  • dr-x------ a directory whose user class has read and execute permissions and whose group and others classes have no permissions.

Numeric Representation

Another method for representing permissions is an octal (base-8) notation as shown. This notation consists of at least three digits. Each of the three rightmost digits represents a different component of the permissions: user, group, and others.

Each of these digits is the sum of its component bits As a result, specific bits add to the sum as it is represented by a numeral:

  • The read bit adds 4 to its total (in binary 100),
  • The write bit adds 2 to its total (in binary 010), and
  • The execute bit adds 1 to its total (in binary 001).

These values never produce ambiguous combinations. each sum represents a specific set of permissions. More technically, this is an octal representation of a bit field – each bit references a separate permission, and grouping 3 bits at a time in octal corresponds to grouping these permissions by user, group, and others.

Permission mode 0755

4+2+1=7
Read, Write, eXecute
4+1=5
Read, eXecute
4+1=5
Read, eXecute

Permission mode 0644

4+2=6
Read, Write
4
Read
4
Read

How to modify your .htaccess file

The .htaccess file contains directives (instructions) that tell the server how to behave in certain scenarios and directly affect how your website functions.

Redirects and rewriting URLs are two very common directives found in a .htaccess file, and many scripts such as WordPress, Drupal, Joomla and Magento add directives to the .htaccess so those scripts can function.

It is possible that you may need to edit the .htaccess file at some point, for various reasons.This section covers how to edit the file in cPanel, but not what may need to be changed.(You may need to consult other articles and resources for that information.)

There are Many Ways to Edit a .htaccess File

  • Edit the file on your computer and upload it to the server via FTP
  • Use an FTP program's Edit Mode
  • Use SSH and a text editor
  • Use the File Manager in cPanel

The easiest way to edit a .htaccess file for most people is through the File Manager in cPanel.

How to Edit .htaccess files in cPanel's File Manager

Before you do anything, it is suggested that you backup your website so that you can revert back to a previous version if something goes wrong.

Open the File Manager

  1. Log into cPanel.
  2. In the Files section, click on the File Manager icon.
  3. Check the box for Document Root for and select the domain name you wish to access from the drop-down menu.
  4. Make sure Show Hidden Files (dotfiles)" is checked.
  5. Click Go. The File Manager will open in a new tab or window.
  6. Look for the .htaccess file in the list of files. You may need to scroll to find it.

To Edit the .htaccess File

  1. Right click on the .htaccess file and click Code Edit from the menu. Alternatively, you can click on the icon for the .htaccess file and then click on the Code Editor icon at the top of the page.
  2. A dialogue box may appear asking you about encoding. Just click Edit to continue. The editor will open in a new window.
  3. Edit the file as needed.
  4. Click Save Changes in the upper right hand corner when done. The changes will be saved.
  5. Test your website to make sure your changes were successfully saved. If not, correct the error or revert back to the previous version until your site works again.
  6. Once complete, you can click Close to close the File Manager window.

How to modify file and directory permissions

The permissions on a file or directory tell the server how in what ways it should be able to interact with a file or directory.

This section covers how to edit the file permissions in cPanel, but not what may need to be changed.(See the section on what you can do for more information.)

There are Many Ways to Edit a File Permissions

  • Use an FTP program
  • Use SSH and a text editor
  • Use the File Manager in cPanel

The easiest way to edit file permissions for most people is through the File Manager in cPanel.

How to Edit file permissions in cPanel's File Manager

Before you do anything, it is suggested that you backup your website so that you can revert back to a previous version if something goes wrong.

Open the File Manager

  1. Log into cPanel.
  2. In the Files section, click on the File Manager icon.
  3. Check the box for Document Root for and select the domain name you wish to access from the drop-down menu.
  4. Make sure Show Hidden Files (dotfiles)" is checked.
  5. Click Go. The File Manager will open in a new tab or window.
  6. Look for the file or directory in the list of files. You may need to scroll to find it.

To Edit the Permissions

  1. Right click on the file or directory and click Change Permissions from the menu.
  2. A dialogue box should appear allowing you to select the correct permissions or use the numerical value to set the correct permissions.
  3. Edit the file permissions as needed.
  4. Click Change Permissions in the lower left hand corner when done. The changes will be saved.
  5. Test your website to make sure your changes were successfully saved. If not, correct the error or revert back to the previous version until your site works again.
  6. Once complete, you can click Close to close the File Manager window.
This site is hosted by HostGator!
'; $(window).load(function() { var panels_num=$("div.story-body").find("div.story-body-text").find("div.pane-content").children().size(); var childSplit=Math.ceil(panels_num/2); $("div.story-body").find("div.story-body-text").find("div.pane-content").children().eq(childSplit).before(data); });

Next Story: