Guests attending a presentation this weekend by award-winning artist Katherine Wassink at Museum of the Albemarle will enjoy tea and scones with Queen Elizabeth I, the portrait that is. The event starts at 10:30 a.m. Saturday at the museum. file photo

Guests attending a presentation this weekend by award-winning artist Katherine Wassink at Museum of the Albemarle will enjoy tea and scones with Queen Elizabeth I, the portrait that is. The event starts at 10:30 a.m. Saturday at the museum. file photo

Weekend Guide: Enjoy tea, scones with the queen Saturday

By From Staff Reports

The Daily Advance

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Would you care to have tea with the Queen this weekend? Or perhaps you would like to learn something about conserving your personal artifacts.

Aside from the opening of the highly anticipated “Al Norte, al Norte,” exhibit at Museum of the Albemarle, Saturday presents other, very diverse opportunities.

It seems the museum is your go-to place for happenings this weekend, and they’re all free and open to the public.

Award-winning artist Katherine Wassink will be on hand Saturday, 10:30 a.m. for tea and scones with Queen Elizabeth I, the portrait. Wassink will talk about the history of the portrait while you enjoy your continental breakfast.

The portrait of Queen Elizabeth I is dated to 1593. This depiction of “the virgin queen,” (1533–1603) has recently attracted the interest of historians, art collectors, and a reality program regarding its authenticity. Since the portrait’s purchase in the 1950s by Ruth Coltrane Cannon, a founding member and benefactor of The Elizabethan Gardens on Roanoke Island, the object has been on display there without knowledge of its true history.

Recent research and careful analysis of the oil painting yielded information regarding the item’s age and its painter. The materials used for the portrait and frame date back to the Elizabethan period. The wood on which the image is painted originates from supplies reserved solely for royal portraits at that time.

Research has also revealed that Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger (ca. 1561/1562–1636), a well-known portrait artist from the Elizabethan era, may have been the painter. Similarities between the famous Ditchley portrait of Queen Elizabeth I by Gheeraerts at London’s National Portrait Gallery with The Elizabethan Gardens painting exist.

Both portraits reveal similar angles of the head, the same jeweled and pearl necklace, and the ostentatious crown, along with other jewelry. However, an exact connection to the artist has yet to be proven definitively.

The portrait will be on display through March 2014.

Also Saturday at 1 p.m. you can come to the museum for a lecture by painting conservator David Goist of Raleigh. Goist will talk about “The Best Conservation is Prevention,” followed by a brief question and answer session.

Following the lecture, at approximately 2 p.m., Goist will meet one-on-one with visitors wishing to bring personal paintings in for a condition assessment. While the lecture is free, assessments do come with a cost. For museum members the first condition assessment is free; additional assessments are $20. For non-members the cost $20 per condition assessment. Call 252-335-1453 for condition assessment reservation.

Goist is a painting conservator in private practice offering services including treatment of paintings and painted surfaces plus condition surveys of varied collections.