Out 'n the Cold, a progressive acoustic band, will perform live at the Edenton Coffee House this Saturday evening at 7 p.m. Admission is free.

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Out 'n the Cold, a progressive acoustic band, will perform live at the Edenton Coffee House this Saturday evening at 7 p.m. Admission is free.

Weekend Roundup: Out ’n the Cold to play coffee house Saturday night

By Rebecca Bunch

Chowan Herald

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EDENTON — When Out ‘n the Cold performs at the Edenton Coffee House this weekend they’ll be doing a few things differently from others who’ve performed there.

First, they’ll be bringing their unique style of what they like to call “bentgrass” — as opposed to traditional bluegrass — to the downtown Edenton venue.

And the band will perform live on Saturday night rather than keeping with the traditional Friday night sessions that have become popular with local audiences. The show will start at 7 p.m. and Anita Andersen, who books the talent at the coffee house, advises people planning to come to “get here early if you want to get a seat.”

Martin Parker, who plays drums for the group, notes that those two things are in keeping with the band’s wacky way of looking at life and music.

Parker, of Edenton, began performing with the group after spending years in the music business in Nashville. He found success there performing with musicians like Patty Loveless, Allison Krauss and Ricky Skaggs. But he is probably best known for performing on the road for award-winning country musician Vince Gill for eight years.

Parker said he was glad the band was going to be able to perform there.

“It’s just hard to find a place to play in Edenton,” Parker said.

The band, which plays everything from Bill Monroe to Percy Sledge, is described by Andersen as “an acoustic band that plays classic tunes with a twist.” Or, as Parker says, chuckling, “If we like it, we’ll play it.”

Standing in for veteran band member Clarence Munden will be fellow musician Chuck Hodges of Elizabeth City. Hodges is known to regulars at the coffee house for harmonizing with Andersen and her husband Glenn during some of their acoustic guitar sets.

But the other musicians who make up the group will be there, including band co-founders Dickie Sanders and Red Swain. They met Kent Luton, who went on to become the band’s front man, in high school. From their first performance, at a county fair in 1977, those

three have remained the heart and soul of the group as other musicians have been added. Munden, a bass player and vocalist, and the band’s mandolin player, Edgar Lane, joined the group in the 1990s.

The most recent permanent member of the group is Robert “Muskrat” Reames, who has played his steel guitar at the Grand Ole Opry and is a friend of Parker.

Andersen said that next Saturday night would bring a performance by another local group, The Modest Hominids — an original acoustic rock, reggae, funk, jam band. Music will begin at 7 p.m. and there will be no music on Friday night.

Members of the Modest Hominids include Darren Fueston, vocals and acoustic guitar; David Fueston, drums; and Danny Sawyer on lead guitar.

Admission is free. Food and beverages will be available.