Skip to main content

News Stories

featured

People started gathering near the Elizabeth City waterfront early Friday afternoon for what local officials said would be an impressive early Fourth of July fireworks show.


Local Events

Latest e-Edition

Special Editions

TARBORO — The Edenton Steamers had their 10-game winning streak snapped Thursday night in Tarboro, losing to the River Bandits 10-5. This was just the second road loss of the season for Edenton, with both losses coming at Tarboro Municipal Stadium. The Steamers fall to 16-5 overall, and 12-5…

The Edenton Steamers took down the Virginia Beach Sea Dogs 6-3 at Historic Hicks Field on Tuesday. It was the second Cantaloupes night for the Steamers, who will play as the Cantaloupes every Tuesday home game, thanks to a partnership with the Boys and Girls Club. This was the ninth straight…

TARBORO — The Edenton Steamers have won eight straight games for the first time since 2020, taking down the Tarboro River Bandits 12-4 at Tarboro Municipal Stadium. The offense showed up big again, scoring double digits runs for the sixth time during the eight game winning streak.

Opinion

The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent opinion overturning Roe vs Wade returned the abortion issue back to the states. Current North Carolina law restricts abortions to the first 20 weeks of pregnancy with exceptions for the health of the mother.

Welcome to Sharia Law courtesy of the U.S. Supreme Court. The latest decisions on abortion rights, public funds paying for religious schooling, and gun rights shows what happens in a democracy when the highest court in the land is taken over by religious zealots and super conservatives.

Features

EDENTON — The Edenton Tea Party Chapter of the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution has won the NSDAR’s National 1st place award for its Independence Day Weekend celebration.

Sometime back, the children at church and I were talking about where people turn for power. I had a small LED (light emitting diode) attached to leads which I held up and asked, “I would like for this to emit light; how can I make that happen?”

State AP Stories

North Carolina's Democratic attorney general has not yet indicated whether he will ask a court to lift the injunction on a state law banning abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy. Attorney General Josh Stein told Republican lawmakers on Friday that his department’s attorneys are reviewing the litigation that led a federal court to strike down the 20-week ban. His letter responds to GOP demands that he take immediate action in the wake of last week's U.S. Supreme Court ruling that overturned abortion protections. Senate leader Phil Berger and House Speaker Tim Moore warned last week Stein's inaction would lead them to get involved.

The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday agreed to hear a case that could dramatically change the way elections for Congress and the presidency are conducted by handing more power to state legislatures and blocking state courts from reviewing challenges to the procedures and results.

  • Updated

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — A federal appeals court on Wednesday threw out the 2020 conspiracy and bribery convictions of a major political donor in North Carolina and his associate, declaring that the trial judge erred in his jury instructions.

  • Updated

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — North Carolina Republican legislative leaders on Tuesday unveiled state budget adjustments for the coming year, proposing to spend or set aside billions in expected extra tax collections to raise worker pay, recruit companies, build more infrastructure and combat inflation.

  • Updated

PHOENIX (AP) — The skies over a scattering of Western U.S. cities will stay dark for the third consecutive Fourth of July as some major fireworks displays are canceled again this year — some over wildfire concerns amid dry weather and others because of enduring pandemic-related staffing and …

National & World AP Stories

South Africans are struggling in the dark to cope with increased power cuts that have hit households and businesses across the country. The rolling power cuts have been experienced for years but this week the country’s state-owned power utility Eskom extended them so that some residents and businesses have gone without power for more than 9 hours a day. A strike by Eskom workers added to the utility’s woes which experts say include breakdowns of its aging coal-fired power plants, insufficient generation capacity and corruption.The prolonged power cuts are hitting South Africans in the winter months of the Southern Hemisphere when many households rely on electricity for heat, light and cooking.

The latest in a litany of horrors in Ukraine came this week as Russian firepower rained down on civilians in a busy shopping mall far from the front lines of a war in its fifth month. The timing of the attack was not likely a coincidence. While much of the attritional war in Ukraine’s east is hidden from sight, the brutality of Russian missile strikes on a mall in the central city of Kremenchuk and on residential buildings in the capital of Kyiv unfolded in full view of the world. The timing of both attacks appeared to be juxtaposed with three summits in Europe where Western leaders emphasized their support for Ukraine.

The Texas Supreme Court has blocked a lower court order that had given some abortion clinics confidence to resume performing abortions. The order handed down Friday night by the state’s highest court comes just days after some abortion providers rushed to resume services. An lower court order issued this week by a Houston judge had reassured some doctors they could temporarily resume abortions up to six weeks into pregnancy. Before that, doctors across Texas had stopped performing abortions in the state after the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade and ended the constitutional right to abortion.

  • Updated

The Texas Supreme Court has blocked a lower court order that had given some abortion clinics confidence to resume performing abortions. The order handed down Friday night by the state’s highest court comes just days after some abortion providers rushed to resume services. An lower court order issued this week by a Houston judge had reassured some doctors they could temporarily resume abortions up to six weeks into pregnancy. Before that, doctors across Texas had stopped performing abortions in the state after the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade and ended the constitutional right to abortion.

  • Updated

New York’s legislature has approved a sweeping overhaul of the state’s handgun licensing rules, seeking to preserve some limits after the Supreme Court said people have a right to carry a handgun for personal protection. Gov. Kathy Hochul signed the measure into law after it passed both chambers by wide margins. The law is almost sure to draw more legal challenges from gun-rights advocates who said the state is still putting too many restrictions on who can get a gun and where they can carry it. Backers said the new law will strike the right balance between complying with the Supreme Court’s ruling and trying to ensure that weapons stay out of the hands of criminals.

  • Updated

Ukrainian authorities say Russian missile attacks on residential buildings in a coastal town near the port city of Odesa have killed at least 21 people, including an 11-year-old boy, his mother and a soccer coach. Video of the pre-dawn attack Friday showed the charred remains of buildings in the small town of Serhiivka. The Ukrainian president’s office said three X-22 missiles fired by Russian bombers struck an apartment building and a campsite. The assault came after Russian forces withdrew from a nearby Black Sea island on Thursday. Despite the withdrawal, Ukraine's military reported Friday that Russian warplanes bombed Snake Island.

  • Updated

The U.S. Supreme Court on Friday overturned Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that had provided a constitutional right to abortion. The ruling is expected to lead to abortion bans in roughly half the states, although the timing of those laws taking effect varies.

  • Updated

Decades of anti-abortion laws have been created in some states, and many of them conflict with each other. Idaho has nearly three dozen anti-abortion laws dating back to 1973, and Attorney General Lawrence Wasden's office says he i giving them all a close look to see which might be enforceable now that the U.S. Supreme Court has overturned Roe v. Wade. But it's not an easy question — in Arizona, leaders in the Republican Party disagree over whether an abortion law from 1901 should be enforced over a 2022 version. Grant Loebs is the president of the Idaho Prosecuting Attorneys Association. He says decision on whether to charge someone under an older abortion law will probably come down to individual prosecutors at first.