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The signs of a coming recession are all around us. First, the stock market has fallen since President Joe Biden took office. It is the worst performance of the stock market during the first two years of a presidency since Jimmy Carter’s disastrous term in office over 40 years ago.

A letter writer to The Daily Advance some months ago asked, “How can you get many mansions into one house?” He was referring to the verse in the Bible, John 14:2, which states, “In my Father’s house are many mansions. If it was not so, I would have told you, I go to prepare a place for you.”

Is it really news that Karen Bass will become the first female mayor of Los Angeles? In an era where women have already run Chicago, Phoenix, Fort Worth, Charlotte, San Francisco, Seattle, Washington, D.C., and Boston, the gender of the new Los Angeles mayor should not have dominated the headlines, as it did in numerous media.

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“In this you greatly rejoice, even though now for a while, if necessary, you have been distressed by various trials, so that the proof of your faith, being more precious than gold which is perishable, even though tested by fire, may be found to result in praise and glory and honor at the rev…

State AP Stories

CHERRYVILLE, N.C. (AP) — A Cherryville woman’s first birthday party ever at age 105 turned out just perfect. Line dancers and square dancers performed routines to entertain her, 12-year-old Lily brought her 10-week-old yellow Labrador named Nina for her to pet and she even got the chance to …

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A helicopter pilot and a meteorologist who worked for a North Carolina television station died following the crash of the station’s helicopter next to an interstate highway in the Charlotte area. WBTV broadcasters who had been reporting on the crash identified their colleagues on air Tuesday about three hours following the deadly incident. The men were identified as meteorologist Jason Myers and pilot Chip Tayag. The crash occurred along Interstate 77. Johnny Jennings, chief of the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department, said no vehicles were involved in the incident. The chief said preliminary witness accounts indicate that the pilot made some “diversionary” maneuvers and “probably saved some lives."

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It's holiday time at the White House, and President Joe Biden and his wife, Jill, are plunging into the season. Biden participated in the annual pardoning of a Thanksgiving turkey on Monday. The first lady accepted delivery of the official White House Christmas tree. And both Bidens visited North Carolina later in the day to share an early Thanksgiving meal with members of the military and their families at Marine Corps Air Station, Cherry Point. The burst of holiday activity follows the president's granddaughter's White House wedding and his 80th birthday over the weekend.

The man who was driving a truck that fatally hit a girl in a North Carolina holiday parade has been released on bond. The News & Record reports that Wake County District Attorney Lorrin Freeman confirms that 20-year-old Landen Glass was released on a $4,000 bond. Glass is scheduled to return to court Jan. 26. Raleigh police say the driver of a white pickup truck towing a float in the Raleigh Christmas parade on Saturday morning lost control and hit the girl. She died from her injuries. Glass was charged with misdemeanor death by motor vehicle, careless and reckless driving and other offenses. A family member told WRAL-TV that Glass would not be making a statement.

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A historically Black university in North Carolina says it has filed a complaint with the Department of Justice seeking a review of a search of a bus carrying students during a traffic stop in South Carolina last month. Shaw University President Paulette Dillard has accused law enforcement officers of racially profiling students traveling to a conference in Atlanta. Spartanburg County Sheriff Chuck Wright called the accusations false, saying officers stopped the bus because it was swerving. Dillard says the issue is how the alleged minor violation turned into a drug search. The complaint states that a lane violation would be insufficient justification for a search and students’ privacy was violated because they didn’t consent to a luggage search.

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Police say a vehicle towing a float for a holiday parade in North Carolina crashed, killing a girl participating in the event. A Raleigh Police Department news release says the driver who lost control of the vehicle and struck the child was charged with reckless driving and other offenses. Witnesses told WTVD-TV that people attending the Raleigh Christmas Parade heard the truck’s driver screaming that he had lost control of the vehicle and couldn’t stop it before the crash. Nobody else at the parade was injured in the collision.

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Democrats celebrated winning North Carolina's lone toss-up race for the U.S. House this month as Wiley Nickel won the 13th District seat. The victory creates a 7-7 split in the state’s delegation — the best showing for Democrats in a decade. But there’s a good chance Nickel’s district and others will be altered for the 2024 elections, returning the advantage to Republicans. The current lines are only being used for these elections. New lines will be drawn by Republicans, who still control the General Assembly. And a new GOP majority on the state Supreme Court likely will be more skeptical of legal challenges that scuttled previous boundaries.

National & World AP Stories

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Hawaii’s Mauna Loa, the world’s largest active volcano, has started to erupt for the first time in nearly four decades, prompting volcanic ash and debris to fall nearby. The U.S. Geological Survey says the eruption began late Sunday night in the summit caldera of the volcano on the Big Island. Early Monday, it said lava flows were contained within the summit area and weren’t threatening nearby communities. The agency warned residents at risk from Mauna Loa lava flows should review their eruption preparations. Scientists had been on alert because of a recent spike in earthquakes at the summit of the volcano, which last erupted in 1984.

Merriam-Webster has chosen “gaslighting” as its word of the year for 2022. Lookups for “gaslighting” on the dictionary company's website increased this year by 1,740% over 2021. Merriam-Webster's Peter Sokolowski tells The Associated Press exclusively ahead of Monday's unveiling that lookups were pervasive all year long. Typically there's a single event that drives searches. The word refers to a form of psychological coercion. Merriam-Webster, chooses its word of the year based solely on data. Sokolowski and his team weed out evergreen words most commonly looked up to gauge which word received a significant bump over the year before.

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Stocks are opening lower on Wall Street as protests spread in China calling for President Xi Jinping to step down amid growing anger over severe restrictions imposed as part of his “zero COVID” strategy in the world's second-largest economy. The S&P 500 fell 0.5% and the Dow Jones Industrial Average lost 0.4%. Energy stocks fell along with crude oil prices. Technology companies were also lower. Bond yields were holding steady. Markets will get another key piece of data on the economy later this week when the Labor Department issues its monthly jobs report.

Officials say more than 2 million people in the Houston area remain under a boil order notice after a power outage caused low water pressure at a water purification plant. The order — which means water must be boiled before it’s used for cooking, bathing or drinking — also prompted schools in the Houston area to close Monday. Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner says the city believes the water is safe but a boil order was required because of the drop Sunday in water pressure. He says water sampling will begin Monday morning and the boil order could be lifted 24 hours after the city is notified the water is safe.

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Don’t look for plastic partitions or faraway benches when visiting Santa Claus this year. The jolly old elf is back, pre-pandemic style. Santa booker HireSanta.com has logged a 30% increase in demand over last year after losing about 15% of its performers to retirement or death during the pandemic. Most Santa experiences have moved back to kids on laps and aren’t considering COVID-19 in a major way. Inflation has taken a bite out of Santa. Many are older, on fixed incomes and travel long distances to don the red suit. They spend hundreds on their costumes and other accoutrements. And Santa bookers this year say there's a higher demand for inclusive Santas, including Black, deaf and Spanish-speaking Santas.

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Chinese authorities have eased some anti-virus rules but affirmed their severe “zero COVID” strategy after protesters demanded President Xi Jinping resign in the biggest show of opposition to the ruling Communist Party in decades. The government made no comment Monday on the protests or the criticism of Xi, but the decision to ease at least some of the restrictions appeared to be aimed at quelling anger. Still, analysts don’t expect the government to back down on its COVID strategy and note authorities are adept at stifling dissent. It wasn’t clear how many people were detained since protests began Friday and spread to cities including Shanghai and Beijing.

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Authorities say two people have been rescued more than six hours after their single-engine plane crashed and got stuck in some live power lines in Maryland. The crash caused widespread outages in Montgomery County. Fire Chief Scott Goldstein says responders were able to safely remove both people after disconnecting the lines and securing the plane to the tower early Monday. He says both suffered “serious injuries” from the crash and that hypothermia had set in while they waited to be rescued. The Federal Aviation Administration says the crash happened around 5:40 p.m. Sunday near Montgomery County Airpark in Gaithersburg.

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As Qatar welcomes more than a million fans for the monthlong World Cup, even its camels are working overtime.  An influx of visitors the tiny emirate has never before seen is rushing to check off a bucket-list of quintessential Gulf tourist experiences: ride on a camel’s back, take a photograph with a falcon and wander through the cobbled alleys of  old markets. On a recent Friday afternoon, hundreds of visitors in soccer uniforms or draped in flags waited for their turn to mount the humpbacked animals.