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CURRITUCK — The Currituck Board of Elections unanimously voted Wednesday afternoon that there is probable cause to hold an evidentiary hearing on Republican state Rep. Bobby Hanig’s challenge of his Democratic opponent Valerie Jordan’s residency in their 3rd Senate District race.


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I remember being able to enjoy coach fights without fear that it could somehow turn deadly. That’s exactly what happened last week in Texas when a youth football coach was shot and killed by an opposing coach.

Last Thursday, Triple A baseball player Wynton Bernard got the word from his Albuquerque manager Warren Schaeffer that he was being called up to the big leagues to join the Colorado Rockies.

Opinion

Well, when it rains it pours and it looks like it’s pouring on Elizabeth City when it comes to our city government. Our City Council’s workload just got bigger with another sudden departure of a city official.

The Health and Human Services Department recently made news with a report touting that “National Uninsured Rate Reaches All-Time Low in Early 2022.” Sounds encouraging, but look beneath the covers and what you find is a quiet but enormous shift from private to government-subsidized coverage.

Sen. Thom Tillis and Rep. Ted Budd recently sent a letter to North Carolina Attorney General Josh Stein, asking Stein to protect crisis pregnancy centers across the state from the “attacks” they have begun to experience since Roe v. Wade was overturned.

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The Currituck Board of Education will meet in closed session at the JP Knapp campus Wednesday at 3 p.m. The work session will follow at 4 p.m. The regular meeting will be at 6:30 p.m. at the Historic Currituck Courthouse. Access the meeting at http://currituckcountync.iqm2.com/Citizens/default.asp.

State AP Stories

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Bank of America says the revenue it gets from overdrafts has dropped 90% from a year ago, after the bank reduced overdraft fees to $10 from $35 and eliminated fees for bounced checks. The nation’s largest banks are moving away from the practice of charging exorbitant fees on what are mostly small-dollar purchases after years of public pressure. Bank of America CEO Brian Moynihan told The Associated Press that he expects whatever residual income the bank earns from overdraft fees will come from small businesses using overdraft fees as a convenience.  .

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Texas has executed a man who fatally stabbed a suburban Dallas real estate agent more than 16 years ago. Kosoul Chanthakoummane was given a lethal injection Wednesday at the state penitentiary in Huntsville. He was condemned for fatally stabbing 40-year-old Sarah Walker in July 2006. She was found stabbed more than 30 times in a model home in McKinney, about 30 miles north of Dallas. Prosecutors say the 41-year-old beat and stabbed Walker before stealing her Rolex watch and a silver ring. The U.S. Supreme Court had declined to delay Chanthakoummane’s execution over claims by his attorneys that challenged the DNA evidence in his case. Chanthakoummane was the second inmate executed in Texas in 2022.

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A federal judge has ruled that abortions are no longer legal after 20 weeks of pregnancy in North Carolina. U.S. District Judge William Osteen reinstated the abortion ban Wednesday after he said the June U.S. Supreme Court decision overturning Roe v. Wade erased the legal foundation for his 2019 ruling that placed an injunction on the 1973 state law. The ruling erodes protections in one of the South’s few remaining safe havens for reproductive freedom. His decision defies the recommendations of all named parties in the 2019 case, including doctors, district attorneys and the attorney general’s office, who earlier this week filed briefs requesting he let the injunction stand.

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The CEO of Bank of America said the recent debate over whether the U.S. economy is technically in a recession or not is missing the point. What matters is that current economic conditions are negatively impacting those who are most vulnerable. Brian Moynihan told The Associated Press that higher gas prices and rising rents are of particular concern when he looks at the health of the U.S. consumer. While gas prices have come down a bit recently, rents are still going up. But overall, the BofA CEO said he believes the American consumer is in good shape and able to withstand the economic turbulence.

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A $100,000 reward is being offered in the case of a North Carolina sheriff’s deputy found fatally shot along a dark stretch of road last week. “Horrified” by a string of shootings that have injured and killed several deputies in the state in recent weeks, on Monday the North Carolina Sheriffs’ Association announced the reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or people responsible for the killing of Wake County Sheriff’s Deputy Ned Byrd. Authorities say they're trying to learn why Byrd stopped there. The sheriff's office says there’s still an active investigation that now includes the North Carolina State Bureau of Investigation, FBI and Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.

North Carolina’s state of emergency for COVID-19 is officially ending more than two years after Gov. Roy Cooper issued his first order. Cooper signed an executive order Monday terminating the emergency at the end of the day. He already announced last month it would end now because the state budget law contained health care provisions that would allow his administration to keep responding robustly to the virus. Cooper's initial order was signed on March 10, 2020. Republican legislators complained about his powers under the orders. A 2021 law will give the Council of State and the General Assembly more say-so about long-term emergencies.

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ASHEVILLE, N.C. (AP) — The “Wellness District” is a place where customer service means taking care of the customer from the inside out. The North Asheville neighborhood is flush with businesses promoting healthy lifestyles all within walking distance of each other.

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Police in eastern North Carolina say two customers at a two fast-food restaurant died when a vehicle crashed into the building. It happened Sunday morning at a Hardee's in Wilson, which is about 40 miles east of Raleigh. The sport utility vehicle struck 58-year-old Christopher Ruffin and 62-year-old Clay Ruffin, both of Wilson. One died at the scene, while the other died at a Greenville hospital. Police identified the driver as 78-year-old Jesse Lawrence of Wilson. He was treated at a hospital and released. Police say they don't believe the crash to be medical- or impairment-related, and no charges had been announced late Sunday afternoon.

National & World AP Stories

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One skyscraper stands out from the rest in the Manhattan skyline. It’s not the tallest, but it is the skinniest — the world's skinniest, in fact. New York architecture firm SHoP Architects designed Steinway Tower, which earns the title of “the most slender skyscraper in the world” due to its logic-defying ratio of width to height. The apartments in the 84-story residential tower range in cost as much as $66 million per unit and offer full views of the city. The tower is so tall and skinny that the luxury homes on the upper floors whip around by a few feet whenever the wind ramps up.

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NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — A U.S. congressional delegation has met with Kenya's new president-elect and the opposition figure likely to file a court challenge to his election loss in the latest electoral crisis for East Africa’s most stable democracy.

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Markets in the U.S. moved into positive territory before the opening bell as Wall Street waits for more corporate earnings reports and employment data. Futures for the benchmark S&P 500 index and the Dow Jones Industrial Average were up 0.2% hours before the opening bell, bouncing back from overnight losses. U.S. markets fell Wednesday on mixed earnings reports and the release of notes from the Federal Reserve’s last meeting, where officials said inflation is too high despite aggressive rate hikes, suggesting support for more increases. Global markets were mixed and oil prices rose.

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Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy is due to meet the U.N. chief and Turkey’s leader in Lviv near Ukraine’s border with Poland. Thursday's talks will focus on the recent deal to resume Ukraine’s grain exports, the volatile situation at a Russian-occupied nuclear power plant and efforts to help end the war. Turkey and the United Nations helped broker an agreement last month clearing the way for Ukraine to export 22 million tons of grain stuck in its ports since Moscow invaded on Feb. 24. The U.N. chief will focus on containing the volatile situation at a Russian-occupied nuclear power plant, while Turkey's leader will try to expand grain exports from Ukraine.

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A Saudi court has sentenced a doctoral student and women’s rights advocate to 34 years in prison for spreading “rumors” on Twitter and retweeting dissidents. The decision has drawn growing global condemnation. Court documents obtained by The Associated Press on Thursday show the unusually harsh ruling, so far unacknowledged by Saudi Arabia. It comes amid Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s intensified crackdown on dissent, even as his ruled has granted Saudi women the right to drive and new freedoms. Al-Shehab was detained during a family vacation to the kingdom in January 2021 just days before she planned to return to her studies in the the United Kingdom.

HONG KONG (AP) — Authorities in Hong Kong say 29 out of 47 pro-democracy activists charged with “conspiracy to commit subversion” under a tough National Security Law have entered guilty pleas in court, as the Beijing government seeks to further silence opposition voices in the regional finan…

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Trump Organization chief financial officer Allen Weisselberg is expected to plead guilty on Thursday to tax violations in a deal that would require him to testify about business practices at the former president’s company. That's according to two people who spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity. Weisselberg is charged with accepting more than $1.7 million in untaxed compensation. The people told the AP that Weisselberg will have to speak in court about the company’s role in the arrangement and possibly serve as a witness when the Trump Organization goes on trial in October. Messages seeking comment were left with prosecutors and lawyers for Weisselberg and Trump's company.

PONTIAC, Mich. (AP) — Thundering gas-powered muscle cars, for decades a fixture of American culture, will be closing in on their final Saturday-night cruises in the coming years as automakers begin replacing them with super-fast cars that run on batteries.