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Opinion

Every day in counties across North Carolina, citizens, judges, jurors, attorneys entering their local courthouse must walk by monuments to soldiers who defended the Confederate’s support of the horrendously cruel institution of slavery.

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The arrival of the COVID-19 vaccines brought great hope in the battle against the deadly pandemic that has affected our way of life for nearly a year and a half. Now, more than seven months into the largest vaccination effort in history, the data and science is clear: the vaccines are effective, but only if people get their “dose of hope.”

Let’s say there’s an outbreak of deadly parvovirus in your neighborhood. Your beloved golden retriever Red, however, goes into a full-scale panic attack at the sight or smell of a veterinarian. You know the disease is highly communicable and potentially fatal.

Every day in counties across North Carolina, citizens, judges, jurors, attorneys entering their local courthouse must walk by monuments to soldiers who defended the Confederate’s support of the horrendously cruel institution of slavery.

Features

“There is one who scatters, and yet increases all the more, and there is one who withholds what is justly due, and yet it results only in want. The generous man will be prosperous, and he who waters will himself be watered.” — Proverbs 11:24-25

State AP Stories

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — A federal freeze on most evictions enacted last year is scheduled to expire Saturday, after President Joe Biden's administration extended the date by a month. The moratorium, put in place by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in September, was the only tool k…

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper on Thursday decided to reverse course from guidance he issued last week and will now urge all K-12 public school students and staff to be masked, even if they have been fully vaccinated for COVID-19.

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — North Carolina's health department will require workers, volunteers and others at 14 state-run health care facilities to be fully vaccinated for COVID-19 by Sept. 30 unless they qualify for a medical or religious exemption, according to a memo.

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HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — The maker of the rifle used in the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting has offered some of the victims' families nearly $33 million to settle their lawsuit over how the company marketed the firearm to the public.

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Spurred by skyrocketing consumer demand during the pandemic, restaurant delivery companies like DoorDash and Uber Eats are rapidly expanding their services to grocers, convenience stores, pharmacies, pet stores and even department stores.

National & World AP Stories

TOKYO (AP) — Any sporting event is, at its heart, a show. It has the actors on center stage, performing for the rest of us. It has the spectators, sitting in their seats watching raptly. And — in modern times, at least — it has the “home” audience, which in the past half century of growing v…

VERONA, Italy (AP) — Shouts of “Liberty!” have echoed through the streets and squares of Italy and France as thousands show their opposition to plans to require vaccination cards for normal social activities, such as dining indoors at restaurants, visiting museums or cheering in sports stadiums.

TOKYO (AP) — The Jamaican sprinter and her Olympic-record time captured everyone's attention. What's under foot, though, might have been a factor when Elaine Thompson-Herah broke a 33-year-old Olympic record in the women's 100 meters.

Online Features