Friday, October 30, 2020
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My first introduction to “The William Tell Overture” came not in some opera theater but as a young boy watching a grainy, black and white television. With the stirring introductory theme music, the announcer would commence with: “A fiery horse with the speed of light, a cloud of dust and hearty, ‘Hi-Yo, Silver! The Lone Ranger …” For the next 30 minutes, I would be enthralled by the tale of right and justice prevailing over the forces of evil. In the end, as the Lone Ranger road off into the sunset, someone would say, “Who was that masked man?”

I’m thinking of ordering a bumper sticker that says, “I survived the 2020 election.” We knew this election cycle was going to be ugly, but this one hit new lows — filled with half-truths and outright lies, conspiracy theories, nasty character smears and little substantive content.

Perhaps you’ve heard winter is coming. Or as Joe Biden warned last week about a third virus wave, “We’re about to go into a dark winter, a dark winter.” He’s playing up the worst case as the election nears, so some context is in order.

In his poem, "If," Rudyard Kipling lists, perhaps, 15 to 20, standards for measuring a man. If you meet these standards, Kipling says, you'll be a man." Let's change "man" to "a thoughtful, mature adult."

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Friday, October 30, 2020

In his poem, "If," Rudyard Kipling lists, perhaps, 15 to 20, standards for measuring a man. If you meet these standards, Kipling says, you'll be a man." Let's change "man" to "a thoughtful, mature adult."

Thursday, October 29, 2020

Last year, North Carolina lost 35 people during the week of Halloween, and nine of those deaths were caused by impaired drivers who were drunk, high or under the influence of some other mind-altering substance.

A recent Wall Street Journal article reported the results of a bipartisan Hoover Institute study on the cost of presidential candidate Joe Biden’s economic plan. This 50-page report examined the results of the proposed democratic policies on taxation, regulations, health insurance, and energy.

Election day will be here soon. Those who are still undecided about who to vote for as president will have to make up their minds. Whoever the president is in 2021 has really got a hard job ahead. President Trump had a good ride for the first three years of his presidency, but in this last y…

Wednesday, October 28, 2020

Upon seeing my Facebook page mainly consisting of repetitive posts trying to coerce young people into voting, many slightly older people approach me asking for ways to increase the low rates of voter turnout among my generation. “You should be on college campuses,” they politely suggest. “Why don’t you try social media?”

Listening to President Donald Trump talk about what’s going on as citizens vote? Hearing the leaders of North Carolina’s legislature? The images they conjure are of chaos at polling places. Confusion and bickering as voters mark their ballots. But when Americans actually vote — whether by mail or at early-voting in-person polling places — they are experiencing something very different.

President Donald Trump is not the first president to be hated by a large segment of the American population. In more recent times, there was considerable hate for President Ronald Reagan. Even though the Democratic Speaker of the House Tip O’Neill and Reagan were polar opposites in their politics, they could be friends. Once, when Reagan confronted O’Neill about nasty things that he said about him in a newspaper, O’Neill replied, “That’s just politics, after 6 o’clock we’re buddies — we’re friends.” Politics today has become something not seen in our history. The true tragedy is that many Americans have bought into the hate, destructiveness and plain nastiness and are seemingly ignorant or uncaring about its long-term consequences for our nation.

President Donald Trump is not the first president to be hated by a large segment of the American population. In more recent times, there was considerable hate for President Ronald Reagan. Even though the Democratic Speaker of the House Tip O’Neill and Reagan were polar opposites in their politics, they could be friends. Once, when Reagan confronted O’Neill about nasty things that he said about him in a newspaper, O’Neill replied, “That’s just politics, after 6 o’clock we’re buddies — we’re friends.” Politics today has become something not seen in our history. The true tragedy is that many Americans have bought into the hate, destructiveness and plain nastiness and are seemingly ignorant or uncaring about its long-term consequences for our nation.

Listening to President Donald Trump talk about what’s going on as citizens vote? Hearing the leaders of North Carolina’s legislature? The images they conjure are of chaos at polling places. Confusion and bickering as voters mark their ballots. But when Americans actually vote — whether by mail or at early-voting in-person polling places — they are experiencing something very different.

Tuesday, October 27, 2020

It’s been seven months since the COVID-19 pandemic turned life upside down in North Carolina, but it feels like seven years. In just over 200 days, we’ve seen at least a quarter-million of our neighbors contract the coronavirus and 4,000 die. Nationally, more than 8 million people have become infected and 220,000 have perished.