We continue to believe Andrew Brown Jr.’s fatal shooting by Pasquotank sheriff’s deputies two months ago deserves more legal scrutiny than it received from our district attorney. There has to be legal accountability for fatally shooting an unarmed man not known to be a violent threat, who wa…

Surf the latest U.S. headlines on immigration, and you’ll read plenty of criticisms from Republicans against Vice President Kamala Harris for not visiting the southern border and plenty of frustrations from Democrats that she needs to focus more on the root causes of migration out of Central America. Lost in this back-and-forth is a noteworthy development: the formation of a task force led by the Department of Justice to go after human smugglers and traffickers.

It is 50 years next month since Henry Kissinger embarked on the secret mission to Beijing that led to a rapprochement: “It is the conviction of President Nixon that a strong and developing People’s Republic of China poses no threat to any essential U.S. interest,” the national security adviser assured leaders there. Half a century on, the thaw is over. The thread running through Joe Biden’s first foreign trip as president is the need for democratic alliances against growing authoritarian might, and though attention was on his meeting with Vladimir Putin on Wednesday, the administration’s real focus has been on China. While Beijing’s record on the pandemic, trade, human rights and other specific areas has rightly raised deep concern internationally, the underlying issue is its rise, and the decline of U.S. power.

The leaders of the North Carolina General Assembly are at a crossroads concerning the most significant issue that confronts the state — fulfilling the state Constitution’s pledge, the right, that every child must have access to a quality education.

“Misery loves company,” so goes the English proverb. But, after the last 15 months, you’d think we’d all agree to send the miserable couch potatoes home.

Of all the commercials that have made cheeky pitches for light beer over the years, this one is a classic:

Republican state senators voted last week not to confirm Dionne Delli-Gatti as secretary of the N.C. Department of Environmental Quality because they think she is insufficiently knowledgeable about something they called Gov. Roy Cooper’s “natural gas strategy” and she was “unfamiliar” with a stalled natural gas pipeline project.

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Republican state senators voted last week not to confirm Dionne Delli-Gatti as secretary of the N.C. Department of Environmental Quality because they think she is insufficiently knowledgeable about something they called Gov. Roy Cooper’s “natural gas strategy” and she was “unfamiliar” with a stalled natural gas pipeline project.

“We can’t just choose to learn what we want to know and not what we should know,” President Joe Biden said last week from Tulsa, Oklahoma, on the 100th anniversary of a targeted massacre of black residents there by their white neighbors. Dozens of people were killed in the attacks, hundreds were hospitalized, and thousands were held hostage, some for days. More than 35 square blocks in the wealthy black community were destroyed. Yet many Americans know little, if anything, about the events. They were never taught.

On July 1, North Carolina local governments — counties, cities and school systems — must have their annual budgets enacted. That’s the law. State agencies — from public parks to county courthouses — need to start a new budget year.

The Big Lie that drives Republican politics at the moment is former President Donald Trump’s false claim that he won the election. The party has peddled another falsehood for more than 40 years.

As the North Carolina Republican convention plays host to Donald Trump this weekend, one thing is clear: the Republican Party has completely surrendered itself to Donald Trump, doubling down on his disastrous record and divisive rhetoric while trying to block help from reaching American families.

North Carolina is emerging from a worldwide pandemic strong and growing, with new jobs and new neighbors arriving daily. We welcome this growth, but in order for our communities to thrive, our infrastructure must catch up and keep up.

This week marked the first anniversary of the death of George Floyd, a 46-year-old Black man who was killed by a Minneapolis police officer who knelt on his neck for more than nine minutes, obstructing his breath as he begged for his life. A jury of 12 found Floyd’s killer guilty of one count of second-degree murder, one count of third-degree murder, and one count of manslaughter on April 20. He awaits sentencing and has appealed his convictions. Three other officers involved are awaiting trial.

It’s a moot point now whether an independent or special prosecutor would have reached the same conclusion District Attorney Andrew Womble did not to file criminal charges against the three Pasquotank sheriff’s deputies who shot and killed Andrew Brown Jr. on April 21.

For the nearly five decades since the U.S. Supreme Court decided that a woman has a constitutional right to an abortion, that right has been under attack by state legislators. But the high court has stood by its landmark decision in Roe vs. Wade over and over again in the rulings that followed.

With no meaningful state law giving North Carolinians the right to see disciplinary records of those they employ in state and local government jobs, how will we ever know?

With no meaningful state law giving North Carolinians the right to see disciplinary records of those they employ in state and local government jobs, how will we ever know?

There may be no profession more publicly and thoroughly second-guessed than educators. From parents to public officials to lawmakers, people believe they know better — or perhaps could do better — than those who educate our children.

To some people, the best solution to gun violence in an already gun-saturated nation — where, in fact, guns outnumber human beings — is, of course, more guns in more hands in more places.

Bless my heart, after much reflection I’ve determined that the only thing worse than no CDC guidance is CDC guidance.

“Our children’s education is too precious to play politics with, and I am going to try my hardest to separate politics from this role — to do what is right,” Catherine Truitt said a few days after she was elected the state’s Superintendent of Public Instruction. “The fact that we elect this position makes it difficult to eliminate politics, so let me just say that I cannot eliminate politics, but I’m going to do as much as I can to take the temperature down and keep this about students instead of politics.”

The pandemic brought much-deserved attention not only to the importance of essential workers, but also to the essential work of mothers.